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Down to the the busy port of Milford Haven Leaving from Neyland marina Constructed on the famous Brunel railway site and on the right shore just outside the entrance the remains of on leaving the marina opposite is the historic Pembroke Dock particularly notable for its Admiralty connections.

During World War II Pembroke Dock became one of the most important stations in waging the Battle of the Atlantic and the ceaseless war against the German U-Boat. At one time in 1943 no less than 99 flying-boats - Sunderlands and Catalinas - were at Pembroke Dock, making this the largest operational station in the world.

PlaneFrom Pembroke Dock many RAF and Allied squadrons operated at various times. Men of many nations flew from the Haven, their patrols taking them far out into the Atlantic, deep into the Bay of Biscay , above the Western Approaches and, as part of the D-Day operations, protecting the sea lanes leading to the Normandy Invasion other buildings around the port are witness to a former age – the finely restored Martello Tower now houses a small museum.

Pembroke Dock is also the departure point for the Irish Ferries Isle of Inishmore on the right is Llanstadwell Church This was built in the 13th century and was visited by King Richard 11 on his way to Ireland. The river channel is such that when the ferry travels in and out of port, Castleit travels on the northern side of the river, and towers over everyone when passing. Indeed visitors to the vicarage at Llanstadwell are often startled by the darkening of the view, even on a sunny day, with the ferry sailing very close to the north shore, blotting out much of the sunlight.

FerryVillage of Hazelbeach where ships were once built and local people used to leave to fish for herring up riverPennar Gap – which eventually leads to Pembroke CastleOn to - Milford Haven - a prosperous fishing port at the start of the century, but following the decline of the fishing industry the Cleddau River has seen the arrival of Super tankers and the oil and gas industry.

Take a look at the tankers close up and experience their size. Milford Haven – famous for it’s connections with Nelson and his romance with Lady HamiltonWhere the once bustling fish dock stood is a new Marina but there are a few ghosts of the former fish market still standing the old fish Smoke House has been preserved and there is a very interesting Museum on the dock which shows the old fish dock and also gives you a close up look at how the refineries work.Passing Milford Angle life boatThorne and Stack Islands at the mouth of the riverDale fort

Neyland MarinaNeyland

There are more than 20 miles of navigable waterway from the nature reserves of the upper reaches to the mouth of the Cleddau past Milford Haven.

Celtic Wildcat departs from Neyland Marina which was originally a railway constructed by Brunel and cruises under the more modern construction the Cleddau Bridge.

Beyond the reach of supertankers and shipping lanes of Milford Haven you Enter a quiet tranquil place often referred to as the ‘Secret Waterway’ Where the only sounds are the birds, the breeze in the trees and the gentle splash of the water .

This is the Daugleddau ( meaning two Cleddaus) – a tidal estuary formed by the confluence of the Western and Eastern Cleddau rivers, and into which flow the rivers Creswell and Carew.

The Eastern Cleddau leads past Landshipping and eventually to Blackpool Mill and Canaston Bridgewhilst to the left is Lawrenny which leads to the Carew and Creswell Rivers
Oysters were dredged from the estuary in Tudor days, those taken from Lawrenny being regarded as the `fattest, whitest and sweetest`.Celtic Wildcat

They were marketed by sea to Bristol and elsewhere, and by land in South Wales and the border shires. In the early 19 th century they were said to be `found here in great abundance and conveyed principally to the London market in boats from Chatham and Rochester `. This trade more or less ended in the 1850`s.

Other maritime activities are reflected in the 1841 Census which shows 15 watermen, 12 mariners, 3 shipwrights, 6 apprentice shipwrights and a ferryman. 50 years later there were only 2 mariners, 1 shipwright and 3 ferrymen. Eventually the development of larger quays further down the river and the decline of the coal and limestone industries meant the end of trading from Lawrenny.

There are still some oyster beds being fished today.

 

River Cruises

Nick or Julie
Tel: 01646 600313
Mobile: 07970 540940
Email: Celticcharter@aol.com


ID: 919  Revised:07/02/2011 12:03:09

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